GCSE English results contested in High Court







The academic qualification awarded in a specific subject to students between 14-16 in secondary education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland has been questioned on the grounds of the grading system. A three day review may be the consequences of a joint-judicial review delved by pupils, teaching unions, schools and councils of last-minute shifts in grade boundaries in June exams. Exams regulator Ofqual refused to comment. The question before the High Court will be if the grade boundaries used in last June examination will be same as for January 2012’s exams.

Of the 2,300 students who sat for exams in WJEC, by the orders of Welsh government who regulates the board there have already been regarded. Some 10,000 pupils consequently missed out on a C grade in GCSE English, which is a total upset for future educational opportunities for the students, as most of the courses and scholarships require a minimum which was missed by almost 50,000 pupils in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. 150 schools and 42 councils have joined hands together inclusive of student bodies and teachers union to protest in a law-ly manner by bringing the matter to court.

Brian Lightman of ASCL was quoted, “The only fair course of action for these students is to regrade the papers. While many of them will have moved on to college courses or to other options, their grades will remain with them for years to come and that is unjust.”

He also added that the fiasco was a result of a “systemic failure” in the awarding of English GCSE grades this year. While the opposition is also gearing up for the challenge, the court is expected to deliver its verdict before Christmas.

GCSE English results contested in High Court

Shalini Singh,
Gujarat National Law University,
Gandhinagar, Gujarat

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Is law a product like any in the market







LegalThe legal profession has always been known to be a noble profession. Now a debate has arisen as to whether law has just become another product that we find in the market. The answer is yes and no. The debate surrounding the Legal Services Regulations Bill in Ireland is precisely on this topic. Legal services unlike other professions have not subjected itself to any regulatory authority. They are not scrutinized for the way they function or have not been told the do’s and don’ts of the trade. But the legal profession unlike other professions cannot be subjected to the scrutiny of a higher authority because lawyers using the law are often involved in tussles with the state and authorities. Therefore subjecting them to scrutiny of such an authority would be antithetical to their functioning.

Legal Services Regulations Bill

But is law just another product? Is it possible to argue that a person who is a victim of a medical mishap and requires compensation to go ahead with his treatment a ‘consumer’ of legal services. A young man who is wrong accused of murder and whose liberty is at stake can also not be called a consumer. So is the family who is threatened with foreclosure by a bank when they are not able to repay their mortgage payment.  All these people are not voluntary consumers of the legal services. However to the corporate world legal services is just another product that it buys to run its affairs. They need legal services all the time to draw up contracts, to assist in employment disputes, to negotiate mergers, to acquire or rent property, to secure payment for services, to deal with banking and taxation matters . . . the list goes on. The corporate legal world is all but too competitive. This bill will hugely help their cause and bring some regulation into this highly messy affair.

However it is less obvious how this bill is to help the vast majority of Irish citizens for whom law is not something that helps them make their lives smother but something that helps them out of a crisis.

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UK Government website attacked by hackers







UK Government website hackedThe website of UK Government was hit with a hacking attack, making it out of action for several hours.  It was the website of home office or interior ministry of Britain.  Users continued to face problems in accessing the site and a message “page not found “was displayed. A famous hacking group named Anonymous has posted in twitter that it had attacked the website and there would hack attacks on websites of British Government every Saturday.

The group had launched a denial of service attack popularly called the DOS attack. A DOS attack normally is used for disrupting the traffic or normal operations of a website. It is generally executed using a system to launch infinite requests to a website thereby flooding the normal limit or bandwidth. Since, the normal limit is exceeded with requests beyond its capacity it cannot handle such requests. Thus the website gets blocked and cannot be accessed, thereby causing disruption to regulate business activities and legitimate requests.

DOS attacks performed by using several systems or networks are termed as distributed denial of service attack, popularly called DDOS attacks. They have a more devastating effect since they use more systems.  Estonia attack can be a leading example of DOS, DDOS attacks in the recent times. The reports say that the DDOS attacks were launched against the government websites.  The spokesperson of Home Office told that they were aware of online protests and was not willing to comment further.

However, there is no proper information in concerning online protests as there are different messages posted in twitter regarding the same. One of the messages states it is regarding surveillance of emails, the other states it is over extradition from UK to US.

The British Government stated that it was a public website and had no sensitive information in it. The Anonymous is emerging into a group which aims to block government surveillance and policing over the web and internet.  The recent update provides that the website has been patched and now is accessible by public.

UK Government website attacked by hackers

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U.K. public sectors take to the streets.







Over 2 million public sector workers which included nurses, doctors, teachers and border guards took to the streets on Wednesday to protest against the pension reforms put forward by the government.

Pension contributions have been raised by an average of 3.2% of the salary. This has been done to help equalize the contributions coming in and the benefits being paid out. The British Prime Minister David Cameroon said that these reforms have been introduced to reduce the country’s 967 billion pound debt. He considers the offer made to be a very fair and reasonable one.

The Public sector workers strike is seen as the largest since the 1979 ‘Winter of Discontent’. The government claimed that the strike on Wednesday did not have any significant impact and that the major public sector services remained open. London’s Heathrow airport which was expected to be majorly affected by the strike remained largely unaffected as civil servants and even Downing Street staff stood in for the striking officers.

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